Illinois man gets prison sentence for threatening police informant


After sending a threatening message to a police informant on the same day he was sentenced, Trevor Sullivan’s suspended sentence for two counts of selling cocaine was revoked in Oktibbeha County Circuit Court on Friday.

By: 
Faith Lifer
Staff Writer

After sending a threatening message to a police informant on the same day he was sentenced, Trevor Sullivan’s suspended sentence for two counts of selling cocaine was revoked in Oktibbeha County Circuit Court on Friday.

Sullivan, of Peoria, Illinois, pleaded guilty to two counts of selling cocaine, less than two grams, within 1,500 feet from a church in Oktibbeha County Circuit Court on July 19. 

At that date, the court sentenced Sullivan to 10 years in custody, with the 10 years to be suspended on each count. Sullivan was also placed on five years probation and fined by the court. 

Four days later, on July 23, the Starkville Police Department arrested Sullivan on a charge of retaliation against a public servant or witness. Sullivan was arrested for contacting the confidential informant involved with Sullivan’s sale charges and threatening him. 

After Sullivan contacted the informant, the informant notified SPD. SPD then filed an affidavit against Sullivan.

“The state is here on its petition to revoke the suspended sentence of the defendant based on that charge,” Assistant District Attorney Trina Davidson-Brooks said.

According to Sullivan’s defense attorney, Austin Vollor, Sullivan messaged the informant on Instagram. 

Vollor said Sullivan messaged the informant four consecutive times, in which Sullivan said: 

“Hey boy, just wanted to let you know I’m out, B----. I hope you’re happy with all this. I’m good. Everything’s gonna be good with me. Just so you know, I know where you live. Other people know where you live. Hope things are good in Texas.” 

The informant was interviewing for jobs in Texas when Sullivan contacted him.

“It made the victim believe that somebody would come after him,” Davidson-Brooks said of the informant’s beliefs.

“Your Honor, I think it’s best if the court hears from Mr. Sullivan regarding why we’re back here again just a week after he was sentenced in the first place,” Vollor said. 

Judge Coleman allowed for Sullivan’s account. 

“I couldn’t be more embarrassed or sorry,” Sullivan said through tears. “It was a terrible judge of character on my part.”

“The message was in no way meant to threaten,” Sullivan continued. “I was planning on getting on a plane and going to Illinois and not coming back to this state ever again.”

Judge Coleman still found the message to be threatening in nature, which the defense did not dispute. 

Davidson-Brooks told the court the state gave a recommendation to not accept a plea bargain and wished for Sullivan to be sentenced. 

Judge Coleman asked Sullivan if he had anything else to say.

“I just wanted to end with—I know it does look bad—but it was without planning on hurting the kid,” Sullivan said.

“It sounds like you were just trying to scare him to get even with him,” Judge Coleman said. “I don’t think you have the actual ability to carry out any threat against him. 

“Nevertheless,” Judge Coleman continued. “It is a felony violation.”

The state recommended Sullivan serve a term of 10 years in the Mississippi Department of corrections on count one, a five-year suspended sentence on count two and five years of post-release supervision. 

The state agreed to not pursue the intimidating a witness charge. 

In response, Vollor gave Judge Coleman one last plea.

“I believe that he is the same individual one hour after he plead before you, but there are consequences for actions,” Vollor said. “I think an appropriate punishment would be a year in the county jail and put him back on probation.”

However, Judge Coleman decided the district’s precedent would not allow for leniency. 

“Unfortunately, this district has been plagued with serious threats against witnesses and retaliation in Lowndes County,” Judge Coleman said. “I don’t think I can accept that. We’ve already gone out on a limb with this defendant.”

Judge Coleman accepted the state’s recommendation for 10 years in the Mississippi Department of corrections on count one, a five-year suspended sentence on count two and five years of post-release supervision, along with his previous fine. 

JASON WILLIAMS 

In an unrelated case, 44-year-old Jason Williams was sentenced to 24 years in the custody of the Mississippi Department of Corrections in Circuit Court on Friday, after pleading guilty to one count of receiving stolen property, one count of grand larceny and two counts of burglary of a shed.

Judge Coleman chose not to fine Williams, due to the $7,283 Williams owes in restitution for his counts. 

Williams was indicted for the four counts, counts one, four, six and seven, on Jan. 13, 2017.

The indictment for count one states Williams stole and “carried away” the 5x9 trailer of William Martin in July 2016. The indictment for count four states Williams stole and “carried away” the copper wire of APAC Mississippi Inc. in July 2016. The indictment for count six and seven both state Williams broke into Steve Simon’s storage shed, located at 318 Love Hill Road, stealing Simon’s property within five days of each other in June 2016. 

Williams has agreed to cooperate with law enforcement for the trials of his co-defendants. 
 

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